Changes to prescribing Over The Counter medicines

In-line with NHS England recommendations, NHS Dorset has asked GP teams to stop prescribing medicine and treatment for 35 minor conditions listed on this page. This allows GPs to focus on caring for people who have more complex needs. NHS Dorset wants people to have the confidence to look after themselves where they can. This

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Data

GPDPR – Data Sharing

The data held in the GP medical records of patients is used every day to support health and care planning and research in England, helping to find better treatments and improve patient outcomes for everyone. NHS Digital has developed a new way to collect this data, called the General Practice Data for Planning and Research (GPDPR) data collection.

To discover how information about you helps us to provide better care you can visit the NHS Digital website.

The implementation of General Practice Data for Planning and Research has been deferred to provide more time to speak with patients, doctors, health charities and others. No data extraction will take place on 1st September.

  • Data extraction will only commence once the Government has put a number of further measures in place, with the commencement date TBC.
  • Patients will be able to opt-out at any time and any data uploaded prior to your opt-out will be deleted.
  • Patients do not need to submit Type 1 opt-out forms to us. A new centralised process will be put in place by the Government to make the process more straightforward and more information will be provided by the Government in due course.

NHS Digital will collect the following:

  • data on your sex, ethnicity and sexual orientation
  • clinical codes and data about diagnoses, symptoms, observations, test results, medications, allergies, immunisations, referrals and recalls, and appointments, including information about your physical, mental and sexual health
  • data about staff who have treated you

NHS Digital will not collect:

  • your name and address (except for your postcode in unique coded form)
  • written notes (free text), such as the details of conversations with doctors and nurses
  • images, letters and documents
  • coded data that is not needed due to its age – for example medication, referral and appointment data that is over 10 years old
  • coded data that GPs are not permitted to share by law – for example certain codes about IVF treatment, and certain information about gender re-assignment
Freedom of Information


The Freedom of Information Act 
creates a right of access to recorded information and obliges a public authority to:

  • Have a publication scheme in place
  • Allow public access to information held by public authorities.

The Act covers any recorded organisational information such as reports, policies or strategies, that is held by a public authority in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and by UK-wide public authorities based in Scotland, however it does not cover personal information such as patient records which are covered by the Data Protection Act.

Public authorities include government departments, local authorities, the NHS, state schools and police forces.

The Act is enforced by the Information Commissioner who regulates both the Freedom of Information Act and the Data Protection Act.

The Surgery publication scheme

A publication scheme requires an authority to make information available to the public as part of its normal business activities. The scheme lists information under seven broad classes, which are:

  • who we are and what we do
  • what we spend and how we spend it
  • what our priorities are and how we are doing it
  • how we make decisions
  • our policies and procedures
  • lists and registers
  • the services we offer

You can request our publication scheme leaflet at the surgery.

Who can request information?

Under the Act, any individual, anywhere in the world, is able to make a request to a practice for information. An applicant is entitled to be informed in writing, by the practice, whether the practice holds information of the description specified in the request and if that is the case, have the information communicated to him. An individual can request information, regardless of whether he/she is the subject of the information or affected by its use.

How should requests be made?

Requests must:

  • be made in writing (this can be electronically by email)
  • state the name of the applicant and an address for correspondence
  • describe the information requested.

What cannot be requested?

Personal data about staff and patients covered under Data Protection Act.

For more information see these websites:

Your NHS Data Matters

Your Data Matters to the NHS

Information about your health and care helps us to improve your individual care, speed up diagnosis, plan your local services and research new treatments. The NHS is committed to keeping patient information safe, and will always be clear about how it is used.

How your data is used

Information about your individual care such as treatment and diagnoses is collected about you whenever you use health and care services. It is also used to help both the Practice and other organisations for research and planning, for example research into new treatments, deciding where to put GP clinics and planning for the number of Doctors and Nurses in your local Hospital.  It is only used in this way when there is a clear legal basis to use the information to help improve health and care for you, your family and future generations.

Wherever possible we try to use data that does not identify you, but sometimes it is necessary to use your confidential patient information.

You have a choice

You do not need to do anything if you are happy about how your information is used. However, if you do not want your confidential patient information to be used for research and planning, you can choose to opt out securely, either online or through a telephone service. You can change your mind about your choice at any time.

Will choosing this opt-out affect your care and treatment?

No, choosing to opt out will not affect how information is used to support your care and treatment. You will still be invited for screening services, such as screenings for bowel cancer.

What do you need to do?

If you are happy for your confidential patient information to be used for research and planning, you do not need to do anything.

To find out more about the benefits of data sharing, how data is protected, or to make/change your opt-out choice visit Your NHS data matters.

You can also view/download the leaflet below for your information.